Posts Tagged ‘sober space’

Wednesday, September 7th, 8PM – at the Flying Brock Library (our friends) in Oregon Hill at 506 South Pine Street. We will be doing our usual Open Hours from 4-7:30 then biking on over to the Flying Brick for this event. Join us!

After a series of murders at the hands of the police last Winter, the city of Seattle was the ground for a surge of revolt beyond the control of both managed protests and state repression. After a long period of quiet, people broke years of inertia to interrupt the lie of social peace–and anarchists played a critical role in fueling the fires.

Two participants in these events will present their analysis of anti-police tension, the forces that maintain social order, and the strategies and tactics used by anarchists to deepen social rupture.

Afterward, we will have an open discussion about ongoing struggles in Seattle and Richmond, and potential points for future conflicts.

As always, Flying Brick events are sober unless otherwise noted. Please don’t bring any drugs, alcohol, or show up intoxicated. Thanks! Hope to see all of you there!

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On July 7th the Anarchist Black Cross will be going on a field trip to a local gun store. We will meet at the Wingnut at 5:30 PM to head out. This will be an opportunity for people unfamiliar with guns or gun culture to get some exposure to those things, and have conversations about guns, gun safety, self defense, gun laws, etc. Some of the folks going on this field trip will have experience with  and knowledge about guns.

If you can’t make this field trip, have no fear, the Anarchist Black Cross plans to have more gun related discussions, field trips, and trainings in the future. If you are interested in why anarchists might choose to be interested in guns, we recommend this zine, Piece Now, Peace Later, written by the North Carolina Piece Corps. You can download it here: http://zinelibrary.info/piece-now-peace-later-anarchist-introduction-firearms

The Wingnut is a sober space.

It has been since its inception, and we know that this makes our space different than many other radical spaces in Richmond and the world. We want to take the time, now that we have it, to explain the reasoning behind our decision to create and maintain a sober space.

We want to clear up any misunderstandings about why we keep the space sober and offer up our reasons for conversation if folks are interested.

Inclusivity. Our culture is dominated with substances. There are many opportunities for people to socialize in settings that involve drugs and alcohol. Restaurants, clubs, shows, bars, and even most events at private homes frequently involve drugs and alcohol. These environments exclude many demographics of people- people in recovery, underage people, people at higher risk for arrest, and people who are triggered by inebriated people. Creating a sober space is making a space that is safe for more people than are usually considered in our society. As anarchists we think it is important to be inclusive of groups that are often completely ignored and oppressed. Children need places to go that are safe and sober. People in recovery need places where they won’t be tempted by substances they are trying to stay away from. And people who are triggered by inebriated people need spaces they can go and not have to deal with that trigger. These are just some examples.

Our sobriety policy is one of inclusivity, not exclusivity. We do not think it is asking very much for folks who are not sober to just be sober when they come to the Wingnut. Only 1/3 of the people in the Wingnut Anarchist Collective consider themselves sober. Everyone however agrees on the benefits of having a sober space. Folks who are not sober and are part of the Wingnut Anarchist Collective simply go somewhere else when they want to drink and then come home after they have sobered up. We understand that people often use intoxication as a means with which to cope with a variety of issues, such as depression and social anxiety. We also understand that there are many people with chemical addictions to substances which make it hard for them to not be intoxicated.  We are not trying to condemn any of these people, intentionally exclude them, or make them feel judged for their use or dependence on a substance. (more…)

This is a list of the guidelines we have come up with for guests at the Wingnut.

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    GUESTS

We are a Community Oriented Activist Home

If you are hanging out here or staying here we have a few requests.

  • Ask all residents permission to spend the night, every night

  • No guest is allowed to spend more than 4 consecutive nights

  • All guests should help with food costs (more…)