Posts Tagged ‘slavery’

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/180673835453514/181506722036892/

Members of the Wingnut Anarchist Collective will be organizing to attend this March in November. If you would like to make banners/signs and plan to march with us, please get in touch!! Mark yer dang calendars!!!!

Dear Virginians,
Our youth are facing only the latest developments of imperialism, slavery, and the criminalization of our lives. Friends, family, and loved ones are constantly threatened and in fear of the growing web of the Prison-Industrial Complex. We refuse to be imprisoned for who we are, where we live or what we do not have. We refuse to be housed in cages, and locked out of education and employment opportunities and denied human dignity. We demand freedom, we demand justice, and we demand an end to mass incarceration. It’s time to take action.
CALL TO ACTION: Collective X, a multi-issue direct action collective, is helping to organize this march but we need YOUR help. We need your help spreading the word, getting people involved and making it as fun and creative as possible. Reach out to your friends, families and communities however you feel is best. Come to the march as yourself or in a group marching side by side. Focus on whatever issues are close to your heart.

Examples of issues we are eager to confront are, but are not limited to…

– systemic racism

– the war on drugs

– solitary confinement

– school to prison pipeline

– mandatory minimums

– the PIC

– poverty

– prison abolishment

– inhumane treatment of prisoners

– the cost of imprisonment

– the death penalty

– local jails

– police abuse

– court misconduct

– the abolishment of parole in Va

It would be a great opportunity to meet others that care about these same issues, educate one another and take action together. This is an all encompassing event. Please feel free to bring creative signs and wear colorful costumes. Bring instruments or items from home to make noise with so we can make sure to be heard loud and clear! Most importantly wear comfortable shoes and remember to bring water to stay hydrated!
This is a family friendly event and children are encouraged to come.
The rally, featuring several informed speakers from endorsing groups, will begin at 2pm followed by an fun and energized march promptly at 3pm.

Starting point is TBA

For more detailed information and updates, please check
http://mamirva.wordpress.com\
(coming soon)
Thank You
Collective X

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In honor of the anniversary of Nat Turner’s slave rebellion the Wingnut Anarchist Collective will be screening the movie Nat Turner A Troublesome Property on Sunday August 21st at 7pm.

“This film is magnificent. Required viewing by all who are deeply concerned about race relations in Amereica.” – Cornel West

The movie is a critical look at the legacy and representations of Nat Turner and ‘historical’ interpretations of him and the slave rebellion of 1931. The movie is only an hour long, and there will be discussion afterwards. The Wingnut is a sober, all ages space.  2005 Barton Avenue or call 804 303 5449 for more information.

For folks who don’t know, Nat Turner led a slave rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia on August 21, 1831 that resulted in 56 deaths of white people. Turner was smart and also very religious. He believed he was destined to do something, and that signs pointed towards a rebellion against slavery.

Turner started with a few fellow slaves, and then went from house to house freeing slaves and killing white people. Eventually around 70 slaves and freed blacks were involved. They actually avoided attacking some homes of poor white people, thinking they had more in common with the blacks.

Turner and 56 other blacks supposedly involved were then later murdered by the state. An additional 200 or so blacks were murdered across the state as well, by mobs and militias.

October 2nd, 1800- November 11, 1831

Nat Turner was born the year of Gabriel’s attempted revolt. 31 years after Gabriel, the situation for black people in America had not changed. Abolitionists and others did not take the risks necessary to end slavery, the movement was not strong enough.

About the Film:
Nat Turner’s slave rebellion is a watershed event in America’s long and troubled history of slavery and racial conflict. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property tells the story of that violent confrontation and of the ways that story has been continuously re-told during the years since 1831. It is a film about a critical moment in American history and of the multiple ways in which that moment has since been remembered. (more…)

The Mysterious Rabbit Puppet Army is coming to the Wingnut on Wednesday July 6th at 7pm!

No cover cost, but bring some money to donate to the Puppet Army if you can!

They will be performing a compelling shadow puppet show of a history of the Prison Industrial Complex from slavery to where it is today. There will also be some other road show elements and presentations as well as a few anti-capitalist fairy tales using rod puppets. All of our shows are non sub-culturally specific and child friendly.

Their tour is to promote awareness about Prison Industrial Complex, it’s effects, and talk about some of the things they’re doing against it and  to talk to other people about what they’re doing and ideas they had.

They are members of the Chapel Hill Prison Books Collective (prisonbooks.info) You can see their big hit here http://www.crimethinc.com/blog/2009/04/25/security-culture-the-puppet-show/

The Wingnut is located at 2005 Barton Avenue. It is a sober, all ages space. Call (804) 303 5449 or email wingnut_collective@yahoo.com for more information.

The Richmond Anarchist Black Cross will also have literature at this event about the prison industrial complex and how people can get involved locally to support prisoners and work to abolish prisons.

Please read this article and sign the petition about the parking of cars on Richmond’s African Burial Ground by VCU. This is a dramatic example of institutionalized white privilege and racism. Imagine the public outcry if VCU built a parking lot on Hollywood Cemetery. Parking on sacred ground is not acceptable, and it has only gone on for so long due to historical and current white supremacy and racism which infect most institutions and capitalist ventures. The Wingnut Anarchist Collective stands in solidarity with everyone fighting to end this disrespectful and oppressive treatment of a historical and spiritual site.

End VCU/MCV Parking on Richmond’s African Burial Ground

by: Kenneth Yates x370724

A place called Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia was once the center of the African slave trade in North America. However if you were to visit this area you would never know it. Beneath the night clubs, condominiums, office buildings, and streets lies a history grossly repressed by capitalist appetites for commercial development.

One hidden piece of history in particular lies beneath a parking lot publicly owned and utilized by the Virginia Commonwealth University & Medical College of Virginia staff and students.



Photo by: Kenneth Yates

 In 1992 local historian and author Elizabeth Cann Kambourian, while researching for a book about a local slave rebellion leader named Gabriel, discovered something. Around 1800, inspired by the Haitian Revolution which was in full swing at the time, Gabriel plotted one of the most organized slave revolts in United States history. The plan was for hundreds of enslaved Africans, free Blacks and a few whites to to enter the city of Richmond, take the governor hostage and demand the abolition of slavery in Virginia. The revolt, however, was crushed after an intense 100 year storm flooded the area, making it impossible for Gabriel and his army to enter the city.

With information given by one of Gabriel’s collaborators, the then Richmond Governor James Monroe formed a militia to hunt down Gabriel and his co-conspirators. Gabriel was eventually captured, tried and, on Oct. 10, 1800, executed at the town gallows, located in what was then called the Burial Ground for Negroes. At least 25 of his comrades met the same fate, either at the same site or in surrounding areas.

The burial ground was retired sometime around 1810, after hundreds, perhaps thousands of enslaved Africans had been buried there. The exact number is unknown. Before long the burial ground itself fell into obscurity, eventually buried beneath 10-20 feet of filler as the land took on many other uses over the years.

Kambourian discovered an old Richmond City map placing the African Burial Ground just north of 15th & Broad Street. That area is now partially covered by Interstate 95, with the remaining portion of the Burial Ground buried beneath a parking lot utilized by both VCU & MCV staff and students. The exact boundaries are yet to be determined.

The Virginia Defenders for Freedom, Justice & Equality have been fighting to reclaim this sacred ground from its present desecration. (more…)

October is a month with a lot of significance in regards to the issues of race, racism, white privilege, etc. This event (which has location TBA, so stay tuned) is just a part of the many events and commemorations happening in October. If you don’t know about who Gabriel was, or what the deal is with the burial ground that VCU has paved over, make it out to hear people talk about what is going on with these issues in Richmond.

Sunday, October 10 · 6:00pm – 8:30pm

Location To be confirmed

Created By

More Info
It’s about time to come together and have a community discussion about the progress on reclamaing Richmond’s African Burial Ground. Following the success of the documentary, Meet Me In The Bottom: The Struggle to Reclaim Richmond’s African Burial Ground, more and more individuals and organizations are stepping forward to declare their support for this effort. Local, state, public and private interests have been meeting and makin…g plans for this site and others in Shockoe Bottom without a way to hear from the community. The Future of Richmond’s Past and the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War and the End of Slavery are creating unprecendented opportunities for public discourse on difficult topics. Who is telling what histories? To what purpose? Let’s come together and provide some feedback, some ideas for addressing the struggle for the Burial Ground and similar challenges facing Richmonders and Virginians every day. What would Gabriel do? SAVE THE DATE and plan to attend on October 10, 2010 at 6pm.See More