Posts Tagged ‘protest’

U.S. Hands Off Syria – Because Attacking People in Syria is Unacceptable; Because Genocide is Unacceptable
Members of the Wingnut Anarchist Collective participated and endorsed Friday’s “U.S. Hands Off Syria, We Need Jobs Not War” protest. The event was initiated and organized by our friends at the Bainbridge Collective and the Defenders of Freedom, Justice, and Peace.
We were glad to see a response to the recent aggression from the Obama Administration towards Syria. We were glad to see everyone there who came out to show resistance to the Military Industrial Complex and blood-hungry US Imperialist government.
However, some aspects of this protest were troubling to us and deserve thoughtful, respectful critique. The rhetoric of “We Need Jobs Not War” seems to aim to appeal to the unemployed or underemployed people living in Amerikkka with the hopes to draw them into the anti-war movement. The problem with that rhetoric however, is that it is US-centric and ultimately misleading as to the intentions of the US government to legitimately provide basic needs for people living within Amerikkkan borders. The reasons we shouldn’t go to war with Syria are numerous and ultimately should have more to do with our compassion for and solidarity with the people of Syria than our desires for jobs at home. And really, how can we make demands of a government that exists off the daily exploitation and genocide of peoples within the US and around the world and the destruction of the earth? Why would we believe that the funds used in Amerikkkan wars would ever be used in an alternative, positive way when consistently, across Amerikkka, as schools are shut down in poor, People of Color neighborhoods, cities are spending millions building new jails for the school-to-prison pipeline.
An inherently oppressive government will never grant the right to dignified work to workers of Amerikkka, who they label illegal and criminal, and whose communities are attacked with chemical warfare through environmentally racist plants and landfills. How can we demand jobs from a government where labor unions are consistently busted with the iron fist of Amerikkkan corporations? How can we demand fair jobs from a government that uses prisoner slave labor as a means of production and uses chemical warfare against them when they rebel?
The United States of Amerikkka is not interested in mutual aid where our work is respected and is inherent to our collective survival. Though we cannot make these demands of the US government, we can challenge ourselves to show solidarity with strikers on the picket lines; with truckers shutting down ports; with undocumented workers creating community gardens to feed their families as the food they pick in the fields is hauled thousands of miles away; with prison hunger strikers. We can challenge ourselves to produce what we need in our communities because a government hell bent on imperialism and transnational domination will never meet our needs. And we can never show solidarity with people being killed by the Amerikkkan police and military if we dichotomously denounce and ask for the help of the government.
We want to support the Syrian people in their revolutionary struggle for their own liberation; perhaps one way to do this is by creating mutual-aid in our own communities, and thereby rejecting reliance on the US war machine, attacking poverty drafting into the military. In acknowledging the struggle for liberation in Syria, we recognize US intervention would not be the beginning of but a bloody addition to the conflict in Syria. We acknowledge people living in Syria are the only people who can legitimately create self-determination, and decide what that looks like, for themselves. It is so important to stand against US imperialism; though we also challenge ourselves and others to stand in solidarity with peoples struggling against oppressive states regardless of/before US involvement and to strive for a broader scope of understanding to the complexities of struggle outside a Western lens. We also recognize that we do not currently have communication with folks in Syria or from Syria with the exception of a few anarchist articles on Syria or by people living in Syria. Showing solidarity with the people of Syria means demanding nothing less than absolute autonomy, within all the constructed borders of the world. And that is a demand that no government will ever grant but must be created; it must be built upon the ashes of a government that can exist and has only existed off the blood of the exploited.
We should continue to hold protests and actions against US Imperialism, all genocidal states, and in fierce solidarity with those who struggle for liberation; and our critique is not meant to attack organizers or participants of Friday’s protest. We hope that this will promote more conversation and awareness of the multitude of intersectional issues that come into play every time the US Government decides to use force to interfere in other countries. Our desires and needs will not be fulfilled by Amerikkka’s creation of more exploitative jobs. We don’t think yours will be either. Next time we meet on the streets we hope to hear rallying cries for autonomy and self-determination in the spirit of mutual-aid and collective freedom for the people in Syria as well all those around the world struggling for liberation. We deserve it.

Saturday, July 20th, at 5:30pm, at the Diamond (3001 North Boulevard, Richmond VA) activists against a stadium in historic Shockoe Bottom will be attending the Flying Squirrels game against the Baysox, to hold banners and distribute fliers with information regarding the proposed stadium. One such event has been undertaken before, and there was no trouble from the stadium security, as the action is not designed to be disruptive. 

RSVP through the link. Tickets range in price from $7 up. 

For more information regarding the struggle against a baseball stadium in Shockoe Bottom, and why that’s important, visit this website

From Active-RVA

Vigil for Trayvon Martin tonight at the John Marshall Courts Building.

Tonight, July 14th, at 7pm, at the John Marshall Courts building (400 North Ninth Street), there will be a rally/vigil for Trayvon Martin. Attendees are encouraged to bring signs, banners, and candles. 

Please share widely. Please note that the location has changed from what was previously posted: two actions were combined, and their location changed. John
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monsanto

Update:(****Start Location Change*****)
March Against Monsanto: Richmond
In solidarity with ‘consumers’ across the WORLD,
Richmond citizens are going to March Against Monsanto.
On Saturday May 25th at 2pm, citizens of Metro Richmond will be peaceably assembling in the area of Carytown, Richmond, on the sidewalks of Thompson and Floyd Ave near the Post Office.

Time:
March Against Monsanto: Richmond
May 25th 2-4pm
We will Get there around 1:30 and start at 2pm. The march will start Promptly at 2:15pm!!!! Don’t be late!!!

*****MAP WILL FOLLOW*****

Where:
Corner of Thompson and Floyd Ave-
Carytown, Richmond, VA

Purpose:
•To protest the Monsanto Corporation, Big Agribusiness, and Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s).

•To Express outright condemnation of recent unlawful, immoral and unjust laws (H.R. 933: Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013- Farmer Assurance Provision, Section 735), allowing Monsanto and other agribusiness giants to promote and plant Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) and genetically engineered (GE) seeds while being free from litigation that might prove their products unsafe for human consumption.

• Exercising our freedom of choice, WE demand products containing GMO’s to be labeled
•Until that time, WE call for the immediate Expulsion of all GMO Foods from Metro Richmond, VA!

This nonviolent rally will focus on spreading awareness of Monsanto and corporate agriculture and the harmful effects of GMO seeds on our environment, organic farmers/farms, and our bodies. Participants will be providing information on Monsanto’s corporate crimes against humanity and attacks on our freedom of food choice as well as healthy food alternatives in the Richmond Area (farmers’ markets, Community Supported Agriculture, Seed sharing, organic options, gardens and urban agriculture).

Join Richmond Food Not Bombs to help cook for the May Day Living Wage at VCU Rally.
May 1st at 10am at 1401 West Leigh Street (not the same address where we cook on Sundays)

Much of the prep work will take place before the cooking period; don’t be alarmed by the short period of time.

Food Not Bombs is making rice, chili, and green salad to serve after the VCU Living Wage Campaign’s May Day rally for a living wage. The cooking will take place at Kat McNeal’s house, near the Lombardy Kroger. If you become lost, call Kat at 703-859-0393.

We need extra hands primarily for loading the vehicles, some vehicles to load, and some people who feel comfortable lifting heavy pots of hot food. We will serve at 1pm, at Monroe Park.

We also need a volunteer to print handbills for FNB, to provide to diners who may not have heard of us.

A documentary recently completed by Baldeep on Richmond Food Not Bombs.
Please watch and share!
We are always looking for more organizers, more political events, more donations, more fundraisers, etc.

Thanks Baldeep!

We’d like everyone, but especially interested folks who have never been before, to join us Sunday the 20th for our first Greeting Day!

Have you heard about Richmond Food Not Bombs, but been unsure about approaching a group of strangers in an unfamiliar setting? Not sure what food access justice means? Do you have questions about the politics, history, or process of RVA Food Not Bombs?

Food Not Bombs is a loose worldwide conglomeration of local food justice organizations, who believe that food is a right and the conditions of poverty are a kind of structural violence. Richmond Food Not Bombs has been in operation for eighteen years, serving a vegan meal that is free to all and prepared from donations and food that would otherwise go to waste, on Sunday evenings in Monroe Park. RVA FNB has only ever missed two servings in their entire near-twenty-year history. Currently, we cook out of a collective in Barton Heights, from 12:30-3:45pm, and eat in Monroe Park from 4-5pm, on Sundays.

Members are always available to greet newcomers and answer questions at the regular Sunday cooking, eating, and cleanup- and anyone is welcome to attend any Sunday- but we’ve decided to begin a tradition of monthly Greeting Sundays, where a specific member volunteers to act as the greeter and guide for any newcomers. There will be nametags, literature, and a member available specifically to address your questions and explain the process, from grocery pickups all the way through to cleanup.

This week’s greeter will be Kat. If you have questions or concerns prior to Sunday, you can contact her at mcnealkc@vcu.edu, or through Facebook. You don’t need to show up right at 12:30, as this is an informal event. Feel free to come to the specified address from 12:30-3:30pm, and to the corner of Main and Belvidere at Monroe Park from 4-4:45pm. 2005 Barton Avenue!

There will be dogs at the cooking site, which is not wheelchair accessible, and lacks central heat, so dress warmly. Kids are welcome, provided they are supervised. Here is more information regarding accessibility and allergies: http://wingnutrva.org/2012/12/15/accessibilityallergies-at-the-wingnut/ .

Greeting Days will be held on the 3rd Sunday of each month. If you miss this one, there will be more!

Join the Wingnut Anarchist Collective!

For a little over 3 years, the Wingnut Anarchist Collective has existed and consisted only of people who live at the Wingnut house in Southern Barton Heights.

Not only has this restriction of membership been restraining the growth of our organization, but it has been ignoring the many contributions to various projects from people who don’t live at the house. Well, we’re tired of shooting ourselves in the foot, and not empowering people to participate and organize with us!

We want to give credit where credit is due, and organize, as anarchists, with people who can’t for whatever reason, live in the Wingnut house.

To this end, we are separating the household aspects of our collective from the political ones, and opening the collective up to people who identify as anarchists and want to organize with us in this space. Folks who live at the Wingnut house will still have veto power over how many and what type of events are hosted at 2005 Barton Avenue, and residents will still be paying the mortgage and utility bills. The change will be that non-residents can identify as members of the Wingnut, organize events in the space, and help expand existing programs and develop new ones.

Some of the things we have done in the past include: hold Memorial Day bbq’s In Memory of People Who Were Murdered by the State, started Copwatch, facilitated Copwatch and Know Your Rights trainings, distributed anarchist literature, held demonstrations outside of the Richmond City Jail, hosted zine readings, hosted political plays, hosted anarchist speakers and presentations, hosted puppet shows, hosted musical acts, held potlucks, screened political movies and fun movies, held craft nights, playing games with kids, distributed a Wingnut newsletter, created anarchist literature, etc.

Some of the projects we are currently engaged in include: hosting Food Not Bombs every Sunday, the monthly Mobile Food Pantry in Southern Barton Heights, starting the SMART Recovery sobriety group, organizing with the neighborhood association, organizing the Wingnut Radical Lending Library, Southern Barton Heights FNB Grocery Distribution, etc.

Some of the things we would be interested in doing/expanding in the future include: self care workshops, consent workshops, mediation trainings, sobriety support, increasing volunteer support of Open Hours of the space and radical lending library, woodshop open hours, screenprinting workshops, collaborative zines, etc.

Some of our core values include: consent, creating a safer space, anti-oppression work, respecting pronouns and identities, accountability, supporting the growth and education of members, maintaining a sober space, etc.

If you would like to be involved and join the Wingnut Anarchist Collective, we will be holding the first meeting of the political collective on January 28th.

We are putting the word out ahead of time so that there will be plenty of time for people to come talk to the current Wingnut Residents (Dave, Eris, and Mo) about what we are thinking, how this might look, etc.

We are generally thinking that we would have monthly meetings of the Wingnut Anarchist Collective to make decisions and plan events, an email listserv thing, and our mission statement/principles to guide us. We would also like to develop some expectations of participation, so that everyone

We welcome folks who identify as anarchists and are willing to organize around those principles and our core values. We would like to develop things like a Mission Statement and Principles or something similar as a political organizing group.

Get involved!

Food Not Bombs is catering the 5th annual RePHRAME Forum “Eliminating Poverty, Protecting Community”

  • Good Shepherd Baptist Church 1127 N. 28th Street, Richmond, VA 23223
  • A Discussion on “Unpacking the 2010 Census” & the Upcoming Mayor’s Anti-Poverty Commission’s Report

More info on the event here: http://www.facebook.com/events/285008308277367/?fref=ts

We will be cooking a spaghetti dinner for about 100 people. Folks who want to help us cater this event should meet at the Wingnut, 2005 Barton Avenue, at 2pm on Thursday Nov. 1st.

If anyone has garlic, onions, noodles, bread, oil, tomatoes, sauce, etc. to donate please let us know. You can call 804 300 0023 or drop the supplies off at the Wingnut.

What’s RePHRAME you say?

RePHRAME, Residents of Public Housing in Richmond Against Mass Evictions, is an alliance of public housing residents, advocates, and allies committed to housing justice for all in Richmond.

The RePHRAME Concerns & Demands:

1. There should be 1-for-1 replacement of any public housing units lost through public housing redevelopment. In other words, there should be no net lossof public housing units. In addition, location of newly created public housing units, and other aspects of the redevelopment process, should increase the employment, education, and other opportunities of public housing residents.

2. Current residents should have the right to return to newly developed public housing without any additional screening or requalification process. In the past, additional credit checks and other screenings (above and beyond those to which public housing residents are routinely subjected) have been used to effectively prevent previous residents from coming back to the newly developed housing. We believe redevelopment should not be used to get rid of residents who have done nothing to warrant eviction.

3. Public housing residents should have a meaningful voice in decisions regarding their housing and communities. Currently only 1 out of 7 RRHA commissioners is a public housing resident. RePHRAME proposes adding 2 additional seats to the RRHA Board of Commissioners which would be filled with RRHA residents.

4. RRHA currently requires that residents mail their rent payment to a SunTrust bank address in Baltimore, MD. Residents must often pay late fees through no fault of their own due to delays in the mail system or processing delays in Baltimore. In February, hundreds of residents paid late fees when a blizzard caused the mail system to shut down. According to RePHRAME’s research of dozens of housing authorities in Virginia and nationally, RRHA alone requires residents to mail rent out of state. RePHRAME surveyed hundreds of public housing residents in Richmond, and the overwhelming consensus is for a local rent payment option, at either the RRHA rent office in their neighborhood or at a local bank.