Posts Tagged ‘privilege’

Check out this article on 30 ways to be a better ally as part of working towards better activism and stronger movements in 2015

http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/01/30-ways-to-be-a-better-ally-in-2014/?utm_content=buffer45983&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Keep an ear out for upcoming meetings, events, protests, and city council events where more voices and support are needed around issues from #blacklives matter to #fightfor15 to #nostadiuminshockoe

Richmond can be whatever we want, we have to continually work on ourselves, our self care, supporting our friends and neighbors, and communicating openly and lovingly with the intention of movement building. There are thousands of ways to plug in. Ask us how!

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https://archive.org/details/Tmp_28737-KarnageCreations.CalmDown.Fall2014Print2sidedFlipOnShortEdgeFoldReadRelax10122101

Check out the just released issue #1 of Calm Down Zine, from 4 different contributors in the Richmond area – a critique of practices in social justice/radical/ anarchist activism and a call out for more effective tactics!!

Passing the word along – please check this out!!!

ANTHOLOGY CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Working Title: Challenging Convictions: Survivors of Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Writing on Solidarity with Prison Abolition.
Completed submissions due: April 15, 2012.
Like much prison abolition work, the call for this anthology comes from frustration and hope: frustration with organizers against sexual assault and domestic violence who treat the police as a universally available and as a good solution; frustration with prison abolitionists who only use “domestic violence” and “rape” as provocative examples; and, frustration with academic discussions that use only distanced third-person case studies and statistics to talk about sexual violence and the Prison Industrial Complex (PIC). But, this project also shares the hope and worth of working toward building communities without prisons and without sexual violence. Most importantly, it is anchored in the belief that resisting prisons, domestic violence, and sexual assault are inseparable.
Organizers of this anthology want to hear from survivors in conversation with prison abolition struggles. We are interested in receiving submissions from survivors who are/have been imprisoned, and survivors who have not.  Both those survivors who have sought police intervention, as well as those who haven’t, are encouraged to submit. We are looking for personal essays and creative non-fiction from fellow survivors who are interested in discussing their unique needs in anti-violence work and prison abolitionism.
Discussions of sexual assault, domestic violence, police violence, prejudice within courts, and imprisonment cannot be separated from experiences of privilege and marginalization. Overwhelmingly people who are perceived to be white, straight, able-bodied, normatively masculine, settlers who are legal residents/citizens, and/or financially stable are not only less likely to experience violence but also less likely to encounter the criminal injustice system than those who are not accorded the privileges associated with these positions. At the same time, sexual assault and domestic violence support centers and shelters are often designed with certain privileges assumed. We are especially interested in contributions that explore how experiences of race, ability, gender, citizenship, sexuality, or class inform your understandings of, or interactions with cops, prisons, and sexual assault/domestic violence support.
Potential topics: (more…)

This article was posted on the Oregon Hill neighborhood website by Todd Woodson. He gives his perspective on the Monroe Park Advisory Council and the history leading up to their current renovation plans. What is more interesting than the article itself is the comments. Online Commenter ‘Michael’ does a really nice job of arguing the reasons for keeping Monroe Park open during renovations.

‘Michael’, who is not associated with Food Not Bombs or other programs in the park  says:

“Renovations are done to important city infrastructure in segments ALL THE TIME. We don’t close the entire Fan District to address water pipes and repaving and whatever else has been worked on in the city. The park is an important resource to a lot of people, it would be very sad for it to be completely closed off for 18+ months.

As I understand it, the park has been used for feeding programs because of its openness and central location. It is a gathering place, a public space where people who aren’t as fortunate as you and I can go to gather their wits without having to deal with being constantly observed and shuffled about by owners of a building. It is a free space in a central location with public facilities, with lighting and nature and a variety of patrons. Its a special place that should not be shut down in the opinion of quite a many number of people who are tax-payers and concerned citizens.

Why not fight for this or that? I’m not in the business of deciding what is better for other people. This is a public place that others CHOOSE to utilize. We don’t have to bus people in and out, no one has to maintain a building, no one has to be shut away from the public eye, this is a public space and in my heart I believe it should remain that way. Want to renovate? Great, do renovations in the park, but find a way to do it without closing it down and locking people out. (more…)

This is an article written by our friend Ramey Connelly in response to an article and an event that happened earlier this month in Richmond. There was a Sustainability Forum that was happening at First Fridays in Richmond at Gallery 5. Food Not Bombs and the Really Really Free Market were both going to table. However the event was not how we pictured it being. You can contact Ramey at rameysaurus@gmail.com and find out more about the Really Really Free Market at http://www.myspace.com/rvafreemarket
Here is what she has to say!

My response to this article: http://wrirnews.blogspot.com/2010/06/for-local-businesses-future-of-richmond.html

As a community member & Richmond enthusiast, I went to the forum to share information about the RVA Really Really Free Market, but came away sorely disappointed. Not only was there no space or table set aside, but my attempts to remedy the issue were thwarted by rudeness and standoffishness. So much for building community.

Luckily, some friendly neighborhood anarchists at the Food Not Bombs table were kind enough to share their space, and we spent the time co-promoting and discussing our confusion and dismay at what surrounded us.

The so-called “sustainability forum” ended up being a marketplace for people to sell their wares under the guise of being “green” and “eco-friendly”. But the majority of people buy over-processed agribusiness products because that’s what they can afford. Buying/going green is just another form of conspicuous consumption; a way of using money to feel morally superior- a luxury that is not afforded to most of the community.

Instead of having a company selling rain barrels, why not a workshop on how to build your own?

Instead of having a company selling solar panels, why not a discussion about ways to reduce energy use in our everyday lives? (more…)