Posts Tagged ‘parade’

Virginia Pride is September 28th, and we think there should be a queer pride march as part of it, if you have ideas and want to organize to resist assimilation, address issues of intersectionality not addressed by mainstream pride events (immigration, youth, poc, homelessness, addiction, non gender binary, trans rights, etc.) holler at us at The Wingnut Anarchist Collective. we will figure out a meeting in the next few weeks maybe of interested parties. pink bloc wont stop.

As part of the annual Wingnut Memorial Day Party In Memory of People Murdered by the State, we are starting an annual anti- police brutality march.


Bring banners, signs, drums, puppets, noise makers, musical instruments, etc. Especially anyone who wants to bring signs in memory of a particular person or persons who have been the victim of police brutality.

Folks with cameras, video cameras, etc. who want to help with Copwatch should get in touch ahead of time.

The march will leave the Wingnut around 7pm and go through Southern Barton Heights. The idea is to return to the Wingnut before dark.

Like all Wingnut events, this is all ages and sober.

And no worries, the march is not the end of the Memorial Day party, just a part of it.

A C L U O F V I R G I N I A

M E D I A R E L E A S E

April 20, 2011

ACLU Sues Richmond Police Over

Onerous Costs on Parade Organizers

Richmond, VA – The ACLU of Virginia today filed a request in federal court on behalf of activists in Richmond for an injunction ordering the Richmond Police to allow them to hold a May Day parade without having to pay for off-duty police officers.

“Nowhere in the city code does it say that Richmond police have the authority to assess fees on parade organizers,” said ACLU of Virginia Legal Director Rebecca Glenberg. “The police cannot arbitrarily impose costs on individuals exercising their First Amendment rights.”

Kenneth Yates and other organizers are planning a May Day march through Richmond city streets and submitted a parade permit application on March 21. Although city code requires police to issue or deny the permit within five days, Yates did not receive a response until April 11. At that time, he was told that in order to march, his group would have to pay $296 for two off-duty police officers and two police cars. The group does not have the funds to pay for the officers.

The ACLU sent a letter to the Richmond Police Department on behalf of the group informing them that the Richmond parade ordinance does not authorize them to require a person to pay for off-duty police in order to march. Additionally, the ACLU said that applying such a requirement without specific guidelines is unconstitutional. The police did not respond to the ACLU’s letter.

“Without clear guidelines, police may be imposing fees on some groups and not on others,” said Glenberg. “We are concerned that police may be chilling free speech in Richmond.”

This issue is not a new one. Last year, May Day parade organizers were told they would have to pay for off-duty officers in order to march. Ultimately though, the police relented and granted organizers a permit to parade in the street without having to pay for off-duty officers.

“Organizers followed the rules and applied for their parade permit just like everyone else,” added Glenberg. “Richmond police cannot just move the goal posts and add another obstacle that is not authorized by law.”

Yates is represented by Glenberg and ACLU of Virginia Dunn Fellow Thomas Fitzpatrick.

A copy of the ACLU’s complaint can be found online at: http://acluva.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/YatesvNorwoodcomplaint.pdf. A copy of the preliminary injunction memo can be found online at: http://acluva.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/YatesvNorwoodPImemo.pdf.

Contacts:

ACLU of Virginia Legal Director Rebecca Glenberg, (804) 644-8080

During the early days of the Second World War, the people of France (like much of Europe) lay defenseless under the Nazi jackboot. Their government had failed to protect them. It quickly surrendered, and then actively collaborated with the invaders. Meanwhile the people suffered. They felt alone and powerless. Who could blame them? After all, what can one person do against armies that have crushed whole nations? But then on Armistice Day, the people of Paris gathered in a spontaneous demonstration against the German occupation. Among the crowds they saw their friends, their neighbors and co-workers. Among the crowds the found each other and they found the strength to survive the occupation. They found the will to resist the oppressors and the won their freedom. (more…)

Saturday was May Day, International Workers Day, and the Wingnuts along with Richmond Food Not Bombs were super excited to take part.

This was only the second annual May Day Parade in Richmond. Folk have been organizing for months. We screened Food Not Bombs shirts, made black flags, and painted banners. It was a super hot day, but we tried our best to stay hydrated. The parade route was longer than last year. And there were only 2 police cars, which we did not have to pay for. As the parade went down Clay we were kept in one lane. However, when we turned onto Broad Street we managed to take all 3 lanes of traffic.

Pictures to come!