Posts Tagged ‘modern slavery’

Support the Georgia Prison Strike!

The Richmond Anarchist Black Cross wants to acknowledge and support the strike that prisoners in the Georgia prison system have been engaging  in since Thursday, Dec. 9th. Thousands of prisoners have refused to leave their cells to work in their prison jobs.

Though the prisoners have been engaged in this struggle non-violently, the Georgia Department of Corrections has attempted to force prisoners to go back to work using threats and violence to intimidate prisoners into capitulation.

This strike is the largest Prison Strike in the history of the United States of America, which has more people incarcerated than any other country. The strike has been organized despite the oppressive conditions within the Georgia prison system, which speaks to the dedication and passion of the striking prisoners.

The demands of the prisoners in Georgia are things that all human beings have a right to. The conditions in prisons across this country are reprehensible.

The demands from the prisoners on strike in Georgia are the following:

  • A LIVING WAGE FOR WORK
  • EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
  • DECENT HEALTH CARE
  • AN END TO CRUEL AND UNUSUAL PUNISHMENTS
  • DECENT LIVING CONDITIONS
  • NUTRITIONAL MEALS
  • VOCATIONAL AND SELF-IMPROVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
  • ACCESS TO FAMILIES
  • JUST PAROLE DECISIONS

These demands reflect the situation in prisons across the country, including those here in Virginia. The Prison Industrial Complex in the U.S.A. is simply the new slave system. Prisoners are forced to work for little or no money in bad conditions, with few rights or opportunities for recourse. (more…)

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October is a month with a lot of significance in regards to the issues of race, racism, white privilege, etc. This event (which has location TBA, so stay tuned) is just a part of the many events and commemorations happening in October. If you don’t know about who Gabriel was, or what the deal is with the burial ground that VCU has paved over, make it out to hear people talk about what is going on with these issues in Richmond.

Sunday, October 10 · 6:00pm – 8:30pm

Location To be confirmed

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It’s about time to come together and have a community discussion about the progress on reclamaing Richmond’s African Burial Ground. Following the success of the documentary, Meet Me In The Bottom: The Struggle to Reclaim Richmond’s African Burial Ground, more and more individuals and organizations are stepping forward to declare their support for this effort. Local, state, public and private interests have been meeting and makin…g plans for this site and others in Shockoe Bottom without a way to hear from the community. The Future of Richmond’s Past and the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War and the End of Slavery are creating unprecendented opportunities for public discourse on difficult topics. Who is telling what histories? To what purpose? Let’s come together and provide some feedback, some ideas for addressing the struggle for the Burial Ground and similar challenges facing Richmonders and Virginians every day. What would Gabriel do? SAVE THE DATE and plan to attend on October 10, 2010 at 6pm.See More

As part of May in Memory of people killed by cops and the state, the Wingnut and the Richmond Anarchist Black Cross is showing films each Monday about the police state, state oppression, COINTELPRO, and the Prison System.

So come on out to watch this film and talk about it too, if you want. Bring snacks if you have some, the WIngnut is a sober space.

The Angola 3: Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation is an interesting documentary that brings up issues about both the persecution of the Black Panthers as well as the Prison Industrial Complex, race, and more.

This DVD tells the gripping story of Robert King Wilkerson, Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox, men who have endured solitary confinement longer than any known living prisoner in the United States. Politicized through contact with the Black Panther Party while inside Louisiana’s prisons, they formed one of the only prison Panther chapters in history and worked to organize other prisoners into a movement for the right to live like human beings. This feature length documentary explores their extraordinary struggle for justice while incarcerated in Angola, a former slave plantation where institutionalized rape and murder made it known as one of the most brutal and racist prisons in the US. The analysis of the Angola 3’s political work, and the criminal cases used to isolate and silence them, occurs within the context of the widespread COINTELPRO being carried out in the 1960s and 70s by the FBI and state law enforcement against militant voices for change.