Posts Tagged ‘class war’

Richmond Food Not Bombs has a new rotational schedule for the cooksites. For October we will be cooking at 3100 1st Avenue in Highland Park, for November we will be at 1105 Highland View Avenue in Highland Park, and for December we will be at 2005 Barton Avenue in Barton heights. All are near eachother on Richmond’s Northside.
We cook at each site for month at a time on Sundays from 12:30 – 3:30 then we load into vehicles and take the food to Monroe Park to serve at 4 at the corner of Main and Belvidere.

We can always use volunteers to help chop, cook, clean, wash dishes, organize, post fliers around town etc.

We can also always use donations of paper plates, paper cups, plastic forks and spoons, rice, oil, olive oil, vinegars, sugar, flour, pasta, spices, oats, etc.

If you would like to help us with a fundraiser we could certainly use that help as well. If you would like to make a tax deductible donation there is a way to do that too. Please get in touch at 804 300 0023 or mokarnage@gmail.com for more information.

Food is a Right, Not a Privilege!!!!
Food Not Bombs has been serving a free, vegan meal every Sunday in Richmond’s Monroe Park for almost 21 years now. We go out regardless of the weather or holidays and have only missed 2 Sundays in all these years. Everything is done on a volunteer and donation basis. We can really use the help and allies as we face many potential issues due to the recent privatization of Monroe Park (a thirty year lease for a dollar a year to the Monroe Park Conservancy), which threatens the ability of poor and houseless people to be in Monroe Park and our ability to serve free food with a potential year long park shut down, private security, and $35 permit application fee. We do not know when any of this might happen because the MPC is a non transparent private entity, but we do plan to resist and we need your help! For more info on the renovation plans please get in touch!!

Advertisements

Urgent Announcement: The Monroe Park Advisory Council is planning to close the entirety of Monroe Park for at least 9 months for the proposed renovations. Alice Massie just let this information spill. Time to organize to fight this. She said they are putting a 9 foot fence around the whole park. This is entirely unacceptable, and was NOT announced as part of the plans. The homeless, the groups that serve in the park, students who use the park, and many members of the Richmond community who use the park were NOT consulted in this extremely drastic measure.

More on what you can do later. For now, come share food at Food Not Bombs every Sunday at 4pm at the corner of Main and Belvidere. That will be the best way to keep up to date on issues affecting the park and share food with your community. (more…)

This is in response to the recently unnveiled plans for renovations of Monroe Park in Richmond, Virginia, as well as comments about the park from Charles R. Samuels who is the City Councilman for the 2nd district where Monroe Park is located. This is written by a longtime member of the Richmond Food Not Bombs organization, which has been serving a weekly meal in the park for over 16 years.

The Conrad Center at 1400 Oliver Hill Way is an unacceptable location for the centralization of ‘homeless services’. There are multiple reasons as to why this location is unacceptable. The logistical reasons have to do with the difficulty of accessing the Conrad Center. The Conrad Center is in a valley, between two steep hills. This means that for many folks with children, disabilities, etc. the location itself is very difficult if not impossible to reach. The Conrad Center is also geographically isolated, which means that even in nice weather it is a long walk from the other places where homeless people might be hanging out. There is not really any place near by that homeless people could hang out between meals (breakfast and dinner) at the Conrad Center. In extreme weather- hot or cold or wet, people risk their health and well being walking so far.

Before the Conrad Center was a reality, homeless people voiced their concerns about the location. They were ignored. Tactics which could have been implemented to make the Conrad Center more accessible even in its terrible location were ignored and neglected. If people who used the Conrad Center were given free bus passes so they could reach the Conrad Center, it would be a lot more useful to a lot more people. However, free bus service is not provided. And now Richmond’s only source of public transportation, the GRTC bus system is cutting routes and raising rates. Which is yet another attack on the poor and working classes which continues to make the Conrad Center a less and less acceptable location.

Aside from its isolation, the location of the Conrad Center is unacceptable because of its psychological impacts. Situated across from the Richmond City Jail, and next to the court and women’s jail, the Conrad Center is a very stigmatizing place. The location of the Conrad Center is clearly part of an ongoing push to make the homeless less visible, and part of the mindset which pushes to criminalize homelessness. Beyond the terrible location of the Conrad Center, the concept of isolating homeless people from other people is also extremely unhealthy. Creating spaces that are ‘homeless only’ prevents friendships and communication across classes. Isolating the homeless reduces their connections with others in the Richmond community and makes them more vulnerable to racist and classist legislation. Homeless people face oppression from many sides, and isolating them only increases this potential for oppression.

The Monroe Park Advisory Council does not accurately represent the people who are involved in activities in Monroe Park. (more…)

Richmond’s Transit Rider’s Union (RTRU) is up and running, and has the potential to really have a positive impact for many lower and working class people in Richmond. Public transportation is something that many people rely on to get the their jobs, to the grocery store, to school, etc. Neighborhoods like Southern Barton Heights, Highland Park, Battery Park, Brookland Park etc. rely on dependable, useful, and affordable public transportation. The proposed increase in bus fair as well as the reduction of routes amounts to nothing more than classism at best, class war at worst.

Making public transportation less accessible is a direct attack on the working and lower class. It is classist and racist and ableist. RTRU is having a public meeting on June 14th from 7-9pm at 7th at Broad at the University of Richmond downtown space. Richmond Food Not Bombs will be serving light refreshments at the meeting in solidarity. RTRU is partners with Richmond IWW.

For more information you can email richmondtru@gmail.com and go to http://www.richmondtru.org

If anyone wants to become involved in canvassing bus stops in the Southern Barton Heights neighborhood please come by the Wingnut to pick up some fliers.

Here is an article about RTRU:

http://rvanews.com/news/public-bus-users-fight-increasing-fares-route-cuts/28781

This is a new project being initiated by the new Richmond IWW chapter. GRTC and the state of Richmond’s public transportation are both in poor repair. If we want a more socially just community then we need more effective and accessible public transportation options. Please consider helping out RTRU, talking to folks in your area about it, etc.

Especially in areas like Southern Barton Heights, where we do not have many local jobs, stores, grocery stores, restaurants etc. people need a way to get to these important things. If the buses cost more and have decreased routes, this directly impacts the lives of many working class and poor people. Cutting public transportation is classist, and often implicitly racist. Cutting public transportation is an attack on working class and poor people. Joining together increases our ability to stand up for our right to public transportation that is effective and accessible.

There is not yet a website for this group, but there will be soon.

You can contact RTRU at: richmondtru@gmail.com

Here is more information about what the group hopes to do:

“About 88 percent of the Richmond region’s commuters travel to and from work in a car, typically alone,”

Public transit is necessary for the mobility of the elderly and the disabled. It is necessary for communities without markets to access the things they need. For those without a car, it is the ability to seek necessary medical attention, to keep a job, and to get home at the end of the closing shift. It is necessary because the valorization of car ownership leads to ecological disaster, exacerbates the fight for fossil fuels, batters local budgets by deteriorating roads over and over again, and results in daily misery with the widespread congestion of commuting workers.

However, here in Richmond, VA, year after year, bus fares increase and service is cut. The buses have little to no access to suburban job centers. The poor, working-class, and communities of color are punished daily for not subscribing to the car-ownership money pit. And the drivers and mechanics who are the life-blood of the bus system are underpaid, and mistreated. (more…)