“Anarcho-Rednecks Against Oppression” Project Needs Your Help!

Posted: July 10, 2014 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

anarchoredneckclean

Anarcho-Rednecks Against Oppression is a new organization based in Central Virginia, and one of the first projects of the group is to begin tabling at gun shows.

Our goals are to introduce a more diy, class struggle, and anti-oppression perspective to the culture at gun shows, and create opportunities for folks who may have never been exposed to anarchist ideas to hear about them and pick up some relevant literature. We hope that instead of dismissing people who aren’t on the exact same page we are on, we can meet them on our common ground, and through conversation and literature help folks step away from reactionary and racist perspectives and more into being self-thinking individuals.

We aren’t the first anarchists to attempt to reach out in this way, some of our predecessors include the John Brown Gun Club in Kansas and Redneck Revolt in Denver. We would love to hear from anyone who has been involved in these groups, intervened with tea party types, has their own insights about gun shows, etc.

Some topics we are looking for relevant literature on:

Know Your Rights

Copwatch

Security Culture

Anti-Racism

Queerness

Guns (duh?)

DIY stuff that folks at gun shows might be into

If any anarchists or radicals have zines, pamphlets or literature for us to distribute that you can mail us for free to help the cause, titles to recommend, or documents to email us, we would really appreciate it. We hope to develop a lot of original literature over time, but it always helps to not have to reinvent the wheel.

You can mail items to: ARAO c/o Wingnut 2005 Barton Avenue Richmond, VA 23222

or email mokarnage @ gmail.com

 

Our first gunshow will be the C & E Gun Show in Richmond on August 23-24 so if you can, please get any materials to us before then.

The AROC group is separate from the Wingnut Anarchist Collective, although there is some overlap in membership.

Why Redneck? To quote from the Redneck Revolt blog and Dave Strano

“The history of the term redneck is long and complex. One of the earliest recorded uses of the term comes from the 1890s, and refers to rednecks as “poorer inhabitants of the rural districts…men who work in the field, as a matter of course, generally have their skin burned red by the sun, and especially is this true of the back of their necks”.

In 1921, the term became synonymous with armed insurrection against capitalists and the state, as members of the United Mine Workers of America tied red bandanas around their necks during the Battle of Blair Mountain, a two week long armed labor uprising in the coalfields of West Virginia.

Today, the term redneck has taken on a demeaning connotation, primarily among upper class urban liberals who have gone out of their way to dehumanize white working class and poor people. Terms like “white trash” have come to signify the view among these same upper class liberals of poor and rural whites.

To us, the term redneck is a term that signifies a pride in our class as well as a pride in resistance to bosses, politicians, and all those that protect domination and tyranny.

We’re very upfront about our position of being not only opposed to white supremacy, but to the shared culture of whiteness being one that has only been defined by being an oppressor race. What unites white skinned people currently is a shared history of being the footsoldiers of oppression. We want to ensure that as many whites as possible reject this commonly understood idea of whiteness and instead join in a common struggle with workers of all skin colors in a struggle for total and real liberation.

We feel like it’s important to understand our backgrounds and roots, to understand where we come from and organize within those communities. It has been stated over and over again from our comrades and allies within black and brown liberation struggles that only whites can help organize within white communities. We wish to step up and start to build a white, anti-racist working class element of the broader working class movements active in the U.S.

The call ourselves rednecks then, to celebrate the history of treason to whiteness and allegiance to the working class that this term once embodied.”

Advertisements

Comments are closed.